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Category: Fly Fishing Tips

Fly fishing tips by Walter Wiese

Fly Tying Vid: Delektable Bug Stonefly Nymph

Fly Tying Vid: Delektable Bug Stonefly Nymph

The Delektable Bug by Dan Delekta of Beartooth Fly Fishing is a large, aggressive stonefly nymph pattern with “a lot going on.” This version has the chenille body and abundant legs of a Pat’s Rubber Legs (aka Girdle Bug aka Turd), but also a marabou tail and a collar hackle. It has risen to become my best or second-best style of stonefly nymph over the past couple seasons, now certainly eclipsing the basic Pat’s. This variant is tied on a jig hook and has a couple small material additions in an experiment to cross over to appealing to fish who like my OTHER favorite stonefly lately, the Bomb Series nymphs, in this case the brown Stone Bomb. Otherwise it’s identical except in color to the basic Bug.

The basic Bug is the least-complicated version of a whole family of Delektable stonefly nymphs including the Braided Stone, the Hurless, the Mega Prince, the Mr. Rubber Legs, and the Stoner. Most are available in standard or flashback variants. These other variants add, subtract, or change a few materials, but otherwise use a similar tying process. For example the Mega Prince has a peacock herl body instead of chenille and adds biot wings, while the Hurless simply has a body of ostrich herl.

In most respects I use “Delektables” of one breed or another in the same situations where I would use other rubberleg stoneflies. I find the chenille-bodied version given here generally more effective when the water is high and/or off-color, as well as for ornery fall-run brown trout, while during the summer when the water is lower and clearer I prefer the similar Mega Prince or Mr. Rubberlegs.

The 2020 Delektable Flies catalog can be viewed here if you’d like to the stock color combinations and tying procedures: https://www.beartoothflyfishing.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Delektable-Fly-Catalog-2020-WebPDF.pdf

Note that I have no business relationship with Delektable or Beartooth. I just use some of the flies.

NOTE ON FISHING DATES MENTIONED IN THIS VIDEO: The streamflow predictions for the Boulder have changed and it is now forecast to remain above 2000cfs through at least June 17, alas. I now expect it to drop into shape around June 20, 2020.

Montana Warmwater Fly Fishing Opportunities During Runoff

Montana Warmwater Fly Fishing Opportunities During Runoff

The Yellowstone River is now in runoff and will probably remain so until about June 25. We’ll be doing some fishing on area warmwater lakes until Yellowstone Park opens to fishing (probably early-mid June this year due to the virus). This fishing will be “food gathering” of bluegill and crappie, but also fun fishing for bass and pike.

Here’s Walter’s favorite bass and pike fly. Check out his blog for a written recipe.

Good area warmwater options include the following, based on distance from Gardiner:

Dailey Lake: Dailey is really a “cool” water option. It holds rainbow trout, perch, and walleye. The walleye usually require going deep with conventional tackle, but the perch will eat nymphs and small streamers. The perch fishing gets better late in May and in June, while the trout fishing, for fish that can often be big, declines as the water warms.

Bozeman-Area Ponds: Numerous small ponds around Bozeman hold good populations of bass and bluegill. There’s even a pond right behind the mall! These are wade-fishing options. Walk the banks, casting dry-dropper combos or stripping small wet flies for the bluegill, or suspend bigger Buggers and the like over weedbeds for bass.

Three Forks Ponds: Three much larger ponds within the city of Three Forks provide the best warmwater fishing within a couple hours of Gardiner. The middle pond is commonly regarded as the best. These are good ponds for a belly boat or similar craft, but they’re small enough to fish from shore too. Large bluegill and some surprising bass up to five pounds are the draws here.

Castle Rock Lake: Numerous large reservoirs in central and eastern Montana provide good fishing for the whole gamut of warmwater fish, but most are too large to fish from shore. Castle Rock near Colstrip is the exception. This lake holds pike, walleye, catfish, largemouth and smallmouth bass, crappie, and bluegill. The lake is encircled by a walking trail offering good access, but also allows boats with electric motors. Walter has a motor mount on his drift boat for just this reason. The only bummer is that this lake is a solid 5-hour drive from Gardiner.

Fly Tying Vid: Floss Worm

Fly Tying Vid: Floss Worm

This is my version of the Floss San Juan Worm (Sexi Worm, Flexi Worm, Flexi Floss Worm, etc.). This is an excellent pattern for low, clear water. In my neck of the woods, it works well on the Paradise Valley spring creeks in late winter and early spring.

Fly Tying Vid: Pink Trout Crack

Fly Tying Vid: Pink Trout Crack

It’s pink season here in Montana. We tend to fish pink/rainbow scud and sowbug patterns in late winter and spring, not least because such patterns have a lot of crossover with eggs and in any case are a big mouthful for trout putting the feedbags on after a long winter. This one is a variation on the popular Arkansas sowbug pattern, the Trout Crack.

Fly Tying Vid: Faux-Fur Slumpbuster Jig

Fly Tying Vid: Faux-Fur Slumpbuster Jig

The Slumpbuster is a well-known streamer pattern by John Barr. This version is tied on a jig hook using a new faux fur yarn available under many brand names. I have seen three: Sirdar Alpine, Lion Brand Go for Faux, and Niceec Fur Yarn, but there are probably others.

The main purpose of this video is to show the tying properties of the fur yarn. Three techniques are demonstrated: using the material like a Zonker strip, wrapping it as on a bunny leech, and clipping it from the “hide” for insertion in a dubbing loop.