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Category: Fly Tying Tips

Fly tying tips by Walter Wiese

Drag Sculpin Fly Tying Video

Drag Sculpin Fly Tying Video

The Drag Sculpin is representative of the class of large 3-4″ sculpin-style streamer patterns guides on the Yellowstone River often have clients use under strike indicators when shooting for larger brown trout, fish averaging 16 to 20 inches and potentially reaching or exceeding 24 inches. While such flies can be stripped like any big streamer, fishing them under indicators allows even novice clients who can’t properly cast and retrieve large streamers effectively to have shots at large trout. All that such clients need to do is mend consistently with slight amounts of drag between the mends.

The olive variation given here is without question the most consistent color for large streamers in the area, but other good baitfish colors also work: black, gold/tan, white, brown over yellow, etc.

Full recipe and fishing tips at Walter’s blog at https://fishstories.ycflyfishing.com/

Tying Video: Pink Lightning Bug

Tying Video: Pink Lightning Bug

Pink Lightning Bug nymphs are among the top winter flies in the region, especially on the Missouri River where they’re effective from now through mid-May. Suggestive of eggs and scuds, and to a lesser extent mayflies and midges, spin up a few Pink Lightning Bugs to try in your home waters this winter.

Check out a longer description and recipe at Walter’s personal site.

Common Features of Walter’s Favorite Mayfly Dries

Common Features of Walter’s Favorite Mayfly Dries

All of the mayfly patterns Walter uses both for his own fishing and while guiding have at least two of the following three features:

  1. They suggest “impaired” insects, rather than healthy ones about to fly away.
  2. They use slender, segmented bodies with a faint glossy sheen.
  3. They use hydrophobic poly yarn for the wings.

The purple Hazy Cripple above uses all three of the above features.

Read Walter’s full article on this subject over at his website.