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Category: Fly Tying Tips

Fly tying tips by Walter Wiese

Fly Tying Vid: Buttcrack Baetis

Fly Tying Vid: Buttcrack Baetis

The Buttcrack Baetis by Duane Redford is a small, rather unusual mayfly/midge attractor nymph popular these days on Colorado’s West Slope but worth fishing on any clear, heavily-pressured water where the fish eat small, slender bugs.

Fly Tying Vid: Floss Worm

Fly Tying Vid: Floss Worm

This is my version of the Floss San Juan Worm (Sexi Worm, Flexi Worm, Flexi Floss Worm, etc.). This is an excellent pattern for low, clear water. In my neck of the woods, it works well on the Paradise Valley spring creeks in late winter and early spring.

Fly Tying Vid: Pink Trout Crack

Fly Tying Vid: Pink Trout Crack

It’s pink season here in Montana. We tend to fish pink/rainbow scud and sowbug patterns in late winter and spring, not least because such patterns have a lot of crossover with eggs and in any case are a big mouthful for trout putting the feedbags on after a long winter. This one is a variation on the popular Arkansas sowbug pattern, the Trout Crack.

Fly Tying Vid: Soft Hackle Spider

Fly Tying Vid: Soft Hackle Spider

This is a basic soft hackle pattern using a nontraditional material as both thread and body material. While the pattern itself is good, particularly in lakes, the key purposes of this video are: 1.) To demonstrate the method by which I use feather barbs from game bird or large hen hackle feathers to tie soft hackles of any size. 2.) To show the thread discipline required to tie such small flies with such a heavy thread.

Weekly Fly Tying Vid: Dornan’s Micro Water Walker Hopper

Weekly Fly Tying Vid: Dornan’s Micro Water Walker Hopper

Will Dornan’s Water Walker is a red-hot hopper/stonefly/attractor dry pattern in the Rocky Mountain West, probably the single hottest pattern in this category in the Bozeman and Livingston Montana area in 2019. In many respects, it functions as a “less chubby Chubby Chernobyl” that attracts trout that have seen one too many big fluffy hoppers, yet is still buoyant enough to float a nymph and is visible to anglers fishing from drift boats.

This “Micro Peanut” version worked better than any other for me on guided trips in 2019, and was my second-best or third-best hopper pattern overall. It worked particularly well in the month of August.